Category Archives: Primaries

PFP POLL: Mellark/Tarson with healthy lead, Jones and Newsom excel in their primaries

Recent polling conducted by The Panem Free Press shows the Mellark/Tarson ticket to still have a healthy lead as expected even as the President’s approval rating has taken a hit due to the Greek crisis. Meanwhile, Civic candidate Patrick Newsom and Conservative candidate Kaitlyn Jones have rapidly risen to the top of their respective primary fields.

The questions asked were as follows:

  • Which political party do you affiliate with: Liberty, Labor, Centre, Civic, Conservative, Independent, or Undecided?
  • If you belong to the Labor Party, which candidate would you vote for in the:
    • Presidential primary: Iris Canstrom, Sylvenia Denton, Walter Delta, Joan Kindred, or undecided?
    • VP primary: Ophelie Murray, Thomas Stemp, Teraton Wendle, or undecided?
  • If you belong to the Civic Party, which candidate would you vote for in the primary: Patrick Newsom, Samuel Trenton, or undecided?
  • If you belong to the Conservative Party, which candidate would you vote for in the
    • Presidential primary: Robert F. Maxwell, Kaitlyn Jones, Kurtis Pierce, or undecided?
    • VP primary: Lynn Germaine, Jack Oliver, Delia Sutherland, or undecided?
  • What is your opinion of the Mellark administration: positive, neutral, negative, or undecided?
  • Do you approve or disapprove of President Mellark’s performance as president: approve, neutral, disapprove, or undecided?
  • Do you approve or disapprove of Vice President Tarson’s performance as vice president: approve, neutral, disapprove, or undecided?
  • In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support:
    • Peeta Mellark, Joan Kindred, Samuel Trenton, Robert F. Maxwell, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Sylvenia Denton, Samuel Trenton, Robert F. Maxwell, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Joan Kindred, Patrick Newsom, Robert F. Maxwell, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Sylvenia Denton, Patrick Newsom, Robert F. Maxwell, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Joan Kindred, Samuel Trenton, Kurtis Pierce, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Sylvenia Denton, Samuel Trenton, Kurtis Pierce, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Joan Kindred, Patrick Newsom, Kurtis Pierce, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Sylvenia Denton, Patrick Newsom, Kurtis Pierce, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Joan Kindred, Samuel Trenton, Kaitlyn Jones, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Sylvenia Denton, Samuel Trenton, Kaitlyn Jones, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Joan Kindred, Patrick Newsom, Kaitlyn Jones, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Sylvenia Denton, Patrick Newsom, Kaitlyn Jones, Julie Roydon, or undecided?

The results are as follows:

Which political party do you affiliate with?

Liberty – 32 percent

Centre – 27 percent

Labor – 15 percent

Civic – 12 percent

Independent – 5 percent

Conservative – 2 percent

Undecided – 7 percent

If you belong to the Labor Party, which candidate would you vote for in the presidential primary?

Sylvenia Denton – 26 percent

Joan Kindred – 24 percent

Walter Delta – 20 percent

Iris Canstrom – 16 percent

Undecided – 14 percent

If you belong to the Labor Party, which candidate would you vote for in the VP primary?

Thomas Stemp – 37 percent

Ophelie Murray – 36 percent

Teraton Wendle – 18 percent

Undecided – 9 percent

If you belong to the Civic Party, which candidate would you vote for in the primary?

Patrick Newsom – 51 percent

Samuel Trenton – 31 percent

Undecided – 18 percent

If you belong to the Conservative Party, which candidate would you vote for in the presidential primary? 

Kaitlyn Jones – 46 percent

Robert F. Maxwell – 24 percent

Kurtis Pierce – 20 percent

Undecided – 10 percent

If you belong to the Conservative Party, which candidate would you vote for in the VP primary? 

Delia Sutherland – 42 percent

Lynn Germaine – 25 percent

Jack Oliver – 24 percent

Undecided – 9 percent

What is your opinion of the Mellark administration?

Positive – 54 percent

Neutral – 10 percent

Negative – 31 percent

Undecided – 5 percent

Do you approve or disapprove of President Mellark’s performance as president?

Approve – 55 percent

Neutral – 5 percent

Disapprove – 34 percent

Undecided – 6 percent

Do you approve or disapprove of Vice President Tarson’s performance as vice president?

Approve – 62 percent

Neutral – 3 percent

Disapprove – 30 percent

Undecided – 5 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (1)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 55 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 27 percent

Joan Kindred (Labor) – 5 percent

Samuel Trenton (Civic) – 4 percent

Robert F. Maxwell (Conservative) – 4 percent

Undecided – 5 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (2)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 56 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 25 percent

Samuel Trenton (Civic) – 7 percent

Robert F. Maxwell (Conservative) – 4 percent

Sylvenia Denton (Labor) – 2 percent

Undecided – 5 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (3)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 49 percent

Patrick Newsom (Civic) – 22 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 18 percent

Robert F. Maxwell (Conservative) – 4 percent

Joan Kindred (Labor) – 3 percent

Undecided – 4 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (4)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 48 percent

Patrick Newsom (Civic) – 29 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 16 percent

Robert F. Maxwell (Conservative) – 3 percent

Sylvenia Denton (Labor) – 2 percent

Undecided – 2 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (5)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 54 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 26 percent

Joan Kindred (Labor) – 6 percent

Kurtis Pierce (Conservative) – 5 percent

Samuel Trenton (Civic) – 4 percent

Undecided – 5 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (6)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 56 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 26 percent

Samuel Trenton (Civic) – 6 percent

Kurtis Pierce (Conservative) – 3 percent

Sylvenia Denton (Labor) – 2 percent

Undecided – 6 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (7)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 49 percent

Patrick Newsom (Civic) – 25 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 16 percent

Kurtis Pierce (Conservative) – 3 percent

Joan Kindred (Labor) – 2 percent

Undecided – 4 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (8)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 50 percent

Patrick Newsom (Civic) – 26 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 16 percent

Kurtis Pierce (Conservative) – 5 percent

Sylvenia Denton (Labor) – 1 percent

Undecided – 2 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (9)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 45 percent

Kaitlyn Jones (Conservative) – 27 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 14 percent

Joan Kindred (Labor) – 7 percent

Samuel Trenton (Civic) – 4 percent

Undecided – 3 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (10)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 49 percent

Kaitlyn Jones (Conservative) – 23 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 16 percent

Samuel Trenton (Civic) – 4 percent

Sylvenia Denton (Labor) – 2 percent

Undecided – 6 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (11)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 34 percent

Kaitlyn Jones (Conservative) – 21 percent

Patrick Newsom (Civic) – 20 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 18 percent

Joan Kindred (Labor) – 3 percent

Undecided – 4 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (12)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 30 percent

Kaitlyn Jones (Conservative) – 27 percent

Patrick Newsom (Civic) – 22 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 17 percent

Sylvenia Denton (Labor) – 2 percent

Undecided – 2 percent


ANALYSIS: This set of polls should be deeply satisfying for the Jones and Newsom campaigns as they see their leads solidify in the face of the oncoming primaries next week. Likewise, these results should obviously terrify the Trenton, Pierce, and Maxwell campaigns as they now face an imminent threat of defeat. In addition, the Mellark/Tarson campaign should beware: their worst-case scenario isn’t too far off. With Newsom, Jones, and Denton leading their respective primaries, there’s a very real chance that scenario number 12 from above could come true. In that case, the election is within the margin of error with Kaitlyn Jones potentially upending the President in the popular vote.

EXCLUSIVE: Presidential hopeful Kaitlyn Jones sits down for interview with Polaris Septrix

Following a major dispute featuring two of the Conservative Party’s most prominent leaders, the debate for the Conservative Party’s presidential candidates was cancelled on Saturday. Today Polaris Septrix sits down with former governor and Conservative presidential hopeful Kaitlyn Jones in an exclusive one-on-one interview with The Panem Free Press.

PS: Let’s get started, shall we? Governor, you were the last remaining Conservative governor in the nation following Governor Xavier Hansen’s abandonment of the Conservative label. How does your time as governor contribute to your ability to potentially serve as Panem’s next president?

KJ: Thank you for having me today. My time as governor was no walk in the park, as many will easily tell you. However, what my critics won’t tell you is that we got a lot done in District 11 under my tenure. Our legislature was a Conservative majority, but we regularly worked with Liberty and Civic members in order to get what our citizens wanted passed and on my desk. We passed tax reform, welfare reform, environmental reform, you name it. In four years, we passed some of the most meaningful legislation in the District’s history. It goes to show that I have ability to govern and to work with people to get to the goal of a better nation.

PS: However, you only got a single term.

KJ: That’s true, unfortunately. The recession hit during my tenure. While we worked as best we could under that pressure, there’s only so much a district government can do to alleviate the issues that come from the Capitol.

PS: So you are blaming your loss on the recession and on President Canth?

KJ: I do think that the recession was a key factor, since many families were hurting and many remembered that the economy wasn’t bad under Liberty Party rule. I think it’s a big factor as to why we have President Mellark right now instead of President Canth. And look, Rick is a nice guy, but I don’t agree with him on many things. I think he lost sight of his values when he got into the White House. You started to see things like higher taxes and poorer decisions, which put us in a bit of a bind. It definitely didn’t make my life any easier.

PS: Well, he’s certainly not far from many people’s minds when they think of the Conservative Party. How do you plan to revitalize the party and its image following Rick Canth’s impeachment?

KJ: I think that Panem currently associates the Conservatives with corruption and with flip flopping. I mentioned previously about President Canth heading the opposite direction with taxation, and people see that and say, “How is this any different than Liberty politicians, or Labor politicians, or Civic politicians, or Centre politicians?” It looks terrible on us when we campaign on a promise and deliver another party’s platform plank. It certainly hurts us deeply as a party when our leaders engage in corruption as well. President Canth isn’t the only one either, it’s Robert F. Maxwell as well. Voters remember his email scandals, and that’s what they remember about Conservatives. They associate our party with everything that our previous leaders have done wrong. That’s why I am running. We need a fresh start, and we can’t have someone who is the image of corruption or even remotely associated with corruption in the case of Secretary Pierce in charge.

PS: Which brings me to my next question: What is your opinion of what happened on Saturday?

KJ: To put it bluntly, I think that Secretary Pierce is right in one way: Mr. Maxwell is simply trying to remain in the lead like the rest of us, and he knows that he can’t be in the lead if the Conservative voters see who he really is. He can’t answer the tough questions and so he sticks to his campaign rallies where he gets to mandate what is discussed. However, the same can be said about Secretary Pierce. I was fully ready to take on Secretary Pierce with Mr. Maxwell in attendance, with an empty podium in place of Mr. Maxwell, or even in just a one-on-one debate. However, Secretary Pierce avoided the fight, just like Mr. Maxwell. It goes to show that there is a real choice in our primary this election season. You can choose Secretary Pierce, who is effectively who President Canth would have wanted to win. You can choose Mr. Maxwell, who is just as corrupt as President Canth was, despite the fact that he says that he wants to change the face of the party. And last and I hope not least, you can choose Governor Kaitlyn Jones, who is none of the above. If you want a real revamp of our party, you can join me and my campaign in fighting for the true Conservative platform, in fighting against corruption regardless if it’s from a Liberty, Labor, Civic, Centre, or Conservative politician, and in fighting for a greater freedom for Panem.

PS: Well, there you have it. Rising star Kaitlyn Jones, former governor of District 11 and potential Conservative nominee for President of the Republic of Panem. Thank you for joining us tonight.

Real competition? Mellark faces potentially potent candidates in race for reelection

President Peeta Mellark (Liberty-D12) may have began his reelection campaign at the tip-top of the polls, looking like he might coast to reelection in the same way as his first run, but now the President faces a potentially different scenario.

President Mellark, while still remaining popular, is now officially facing a distinct possibility that three popular major candidates will rise from the primary battles waged in Panem’s opposition parties.

Currently the Centre nomination is set to go to Senator Julie Roydon, who has made a name for herself since her election in the previous midterms and proving that she is no political lightweight. Her crowds are regularly that of around 6,000 people at least, showing large support. Roydon consistently has polled highly in presidential polling, typically ranking second to the President.

In the Civic primary, Senator Patrick Newsom has risen to the top of the polls lately after his landmark debate performance against opponent Samuel Trenton. Newsom, to many Civic voters, represents a more activist wing of the party that has typically been pushed aside in favor of the more centrist establishment. Newsom has also been noted for his grassroots support. At this early point, it’s hard to tell if Newsom will be the nominee, but if the campaign continues like it has, it’s likely that Newsom will be able to pose a real threat to the President in a general election.

Last, but certainly not least, is former Governor Kaitlyn Jones. Known for her tenure as the last remaining Conservative governor in Panem, Jones was swept out on an anti-Conservative wave that even her popularity in her district could not save her from. However, Jones unexpectedly declared a run for president this year, despite most analysts predicting that at most she would run for vice president. More unexpected is the amount of support that Jones would garner in a general election. While she currently is third in Conservative primary polling, Jones polls higher in general election polling than her two rivals, typically even edging out Newsom and Roydon when included. This is likely due to her anonymity and due to her campaign to rebrand the party. Voters tend to associate the party with her rivals (Robert F. Maxwell and Kurtis Pierce) and both do not poll well due to their own scandals and relationship to disgraced former President Rick Canth.

However, a true nightmare scenario for President Mellark is if all three of these candidates managed to make it to a general election. True, the president is popular. However, the military intervention in Greece is causing a major dip in his approval numbers, decreasing them by the day. Panem voters when polled have indicated less and less support for the intervention as time has continued, and it’s highly unlikely that Mellark will be able to sustain a massive level of popularity for much longer, especially if the intervention lasts until election day. This is why this scenario is considered dangerous for the President: falling approval ratings along with the three strongest possible candidates could result in a nearly tied election as four candidates take around 20-25% of the vote each, along with potential for spoiler candidates from the Labor Party and independent candidates. In that case, it’s anyone’s guess who the president of Panem will be at the end of the day- and if the current President survives reelection.

However, the likelihood of such a nightmare scenario would be pretty low as of today. Just one part of the conditions that would cause it not occurring (say, Mellark pulls the troops out of Greece sooner rather than later) would likely result in a greater chance of a Mellark reelection, particularly if Jones or Newsom (or both!) lose their nomination fights.

Primary debates swiftly approaching as candidates scramble for coverage

The primary debates for the Labor, Civic, and Conservative Parties are swiftly approaching as each party’s candidates scramble to make a strong impact in their runs for office.

The Labor presidential debate will be held first, being held in District 5. The debate, held in a standard format, will feature all four main candidates, the order of which is determined by standing in the most recent polls and will be detailed below.

Delta — Kindred — Denton — Canstrom

This debate will be focused on a range of different topics, but most focused on the economy, foreign policy, and candidate’s records.

Next will come the Civic presidential debate, to be held in District 8. This debate will be held in a traditional style much like the Labor debate and will be the first of two. The second debate will be held during the primary season. As there are only two candidates, no specific placement will be made in regards to podium usage. The debate, like the Labor debate, will focus on many issues.

The Labor Party will then hold its vice presidential debate following the Civic debate. This is the only planned debate of the VP candidates, and will be held in District 11. The debate will be focused mainly on candidates’ qualifications and previous records, in addition to plans for a potential administration. Candidate order is featured below.

Murray — Stemp — Wendle

The final debates to be held prior to primary season will be the Conservative presidential and vice presidential debates. These debates will be held back-to-back on the same night with one being aired at 6 PM CST and the other aired at 8 PM CST. As with the Labor VP debate, the topics of the VP debate will be focused on party issues and qualifications for the vice presidency while the presidential debate will be a catchall of many topics. The order of the VP debate is below.

Oliver — Germaine — Sutherland

The order of the presidential debate is below.

Pierce — Maxwell — Jones

 

 

Senator Julie Roydon makes presidential run official

Senator Julie Roydon, the junior senator from the Capitol, made her run for president official today on the steps of the Panem Capitol.

“I will not stand by any longer,” Roydon remarked in her announcement speech. “We have many choices for president here in Panem. What we currently do not have is the right choice. We don’t have a common-sense candidate, one that will stand up for all individuals, one that will make sure that the government is not for the corporations but by the people and for the people. We currently do not have a single candidate who is not an ideologue. We must have a candidate who is prepared for the presidency and also is prepared to listen to the people of this great nation. That is why I, Julie Roydon, will run for president this election, and that is why I will be seeking help from all of you in restoring this great nation and giving it back to the people. Enough of the politics. Let’s have some real citizen governance.”

Roydon is the first Centre candidate to enter into the presidential ring, and likely will be the only one. Other Centre politicians, specifically Senators Clarke Randall and Joseph Garrett and former Representative Sextimus Dalton, have declined to run for president in order to give way to Senator Roydon. If no one contests the primary, Senator Roydon will become the party’s first presidential nominee and will make her pick for vice president.

Roydon’s entry is also notable as it cements the rise of the Centre Party in Panem politics. While the Centre Party has been making large congressional gains over the past two elections, this is the first time that they have contested a presidential election, and according to recent polls, Centre is set to make the largest splash against President Mellark and Vice President Tarson in a general election scenario.

New polling shows leads for Kindred, Newsom, Maxwell in primaries; Mellark/Tarson lead in general

Recent polling conducted by The Panem Free Press indicates that both the Civic and Labor primaries remain tight, but show clear frontrunners. The Mellark administration still remains popular, but voters have become uneasy over intervening in Greece. Most peculiar of all is Kaitlyn Jones’ general election polling numbers, which show that Conservatives can compete in a post-Canth era.

The questions asked were as follows:

  • Which political party do you affiliate with: Liberty, Labor, Centre, Civic, Conservative, Independent, or Undecided?
  • If you belong to the Labor Party, which candidate would you vote for in the:
    • Presidential primary: Iris Canstrom, Sylvenia Denton, Walter Delta, Joan Kindred, or undecided?
    • VP primary: Ophelie Murray, Thomas Stemp, Teraton Wendle, or undecided?
  • If you belong to the Civic Party, which candidate would you vote for in the primary: Patrick Newsom, Samuel Trenton, or undecided?
  • If you belong to the Conservative Party, which candidate would you vote for in the
    • Presidential primary: Robert F. Maxwell, Kaitlyn Jones, Kurtis Pierce, or undecided?
    • VP primary: Lynn Germaine, Jack Oliver, Delia Sutherland, or undecided?
  • What is your opinion of the Mellark administration: positive, neutral, negative, or undecided?
  • Do you approve or disapprove of President Mellark’s performance as president: approve, neutral, disapprove, or undecided?
  • Do you approve or disapprove of Vice President Tarson’s performance as vice president: approve, neutral, disapprove, or undecided?
  • In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support:
    • Peeta Mellark, Joan Kindred, Samuel Trenton, Robert F. Maxwell, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Sylvenia Denton, Samuel Trenton, Robert F. Maxwell, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Joan Kindred, Patrick Newsom, Robert F. Maxwell, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Sylvenia Denton, Patrick Newsom, Robert F. Maxwell, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Joan Kindred, Samuel Trenton, Kurtis Pierce, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Sylvenia Denton, Samuel Trenton, Kurtis Pierce, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Joan Kindred, Patrick Newsom, Kurtis Pierce, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Sylvenia Denton, Patrick Newsom, Kurtis Pierce, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Joan Kindred, Samuel Trenton, Kaitlyn Jones, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Sylvenia Denton, Samuel Trenton, Kaitlyn Jones, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Joan Kindred, Patrick Newsom, Kaitlyn Jones, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Sylvenia Denton, Patrick Newsom, Kaitlyn Jones, Julie Roydon, or undecided?

The results are as follows:

Which political party do you affiliate with?

Liberty – 36 percent

Centre – 27 percent

Labor – 15 percent

Civic – 12 percent

Independent – 5 percent

Conservative – 2 percent

Undecided – 3 percent

If you belong to the Labor Party, which candidate would you vote for in the presidential primary?

Joan Kindred – 28 percent

Sylvenia Denton – 20 percent

Walter Delta – 19 percent

Iris Canstrom – 11 percent

Undecided – 22 percent

If you belong to the Labor Party, which candidate would you vote for in the VP primary?

Thomas Stemp – 34 percent

Ophelie Murray – 29 percent

Teraton Wendle – 12 percent

Undecided – 25 percent

If you belong to the Civic Party, which candidate would you vote for in the primary?

Patrick Newsom – 40 percent

Samuel Trenton – 36 percent

Undecided – 24 percent

If you belong to the Conservative Party, which candidate would you vote for in the presidential primary? 

Robert F. Maxwell – 32 percent

Kurtis Pierce – 30 percent

Kaitlyn Jones – 23 percent

Undecided – 15 percent

If you belong to the Conservative Party, which candidate would you vote for in the VP primary? 

Lynn Germaine – 31 percent

Jack Oliver – 29 percent

Delia Sutherland – 27 percent

Undecided – 13 percent

What is your opinion of the Mellark administration?

Positive – 60 percent

Neutral – 14 percent

Negative – 11 percent

Undecided – 15 percent

Do you approve or disapprove of President Mellark’s performance as president?

Approve – 67 percent

Neutral – 5 percent

Disapprove – 15 percent

Undecided – 15 percent

Do you approve or disapprove of Vice President Tarson’s performance as vice president?

Approve – 73 percent

Neutral – 10 percent

Disapprove – 12 percent

Undecided – 5 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (1)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 54 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 23 percent

Joan Kindred (Labor) – 7 percent

Samuel Trenton (Civic) – 6 percent

Robert F. Maxwell (Conservative) – 5 percent

Undecided – 5 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (2)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 55 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 23 percent

Samuel Trenton (Civic) – 9 percent

Robert F. Maxwell (Conservative) – 5 percent

Sylvenia Denton (Labor) – 2 percent

Undecided – 5 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (3)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 51 percent

Patrick Newsom (Civic) – 18 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 16 percent

Robert F. Maxwell (Conservative) – 6 percent

Joan Kindred (Labor) – 5 percent

Undecided – 4 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (4)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 50 percent

Patrick Newsom (Civic) – 25 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 18 percent

Robert F. Maxwell (Conservative) – 3 percent

Sylvenia Denton (Labor) – 2 percent

Undecided – 2 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (5)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 53 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 24 percent

Joan Kindred (Labor) – 8 percent

Kurtis Pierce (Conservative) – 6 percent

Samuel Trenton (Civic) – 4 percent

Undecided – 5 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (6)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 54 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 23 percent

Samuel Trenton (Civic) – 9 percent

Kurtis Pierce (Conservative) – 5 percent

Sylvenia Denton (Labor) – 2 percent

Undecided – 6 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (7)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 53 percent

Patrick Newsom (Civic) – 19 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 16 percent

Kurtis Pierce (Conservative) – 4 percent

Joan Kindred (Labor) – 3 percent

Undecided – 4 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (8)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 50 percent

Patrick Newsom (Civic) – 23 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 16 percent

Kurtis Pierce (Conservative) – 5 percent

Sylvenia Denton (Labor) – 4 percent

Undecided – 2 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (9)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 49 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 18 percent

Kaitlyn Jones (Conservative) – 15 percent

Joan Kindred (Labor) – 7 percent

Samuel Trenton (Civic) – 6 percent

Undecided – 5 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (10)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 49 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 18 percent

Kaitlyn Jones (Conservative) – 17 percent

Samuel Trenton (Civic) – 8 percent

Sylvenia Denton (Labor) – 2 percent

Undecided – 6 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (11)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 38 percent

Kaitlyn Jones (Conservative) – 19 percent

Patrick Newsom (Civic) – 18 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 16 percent

Joan Kindred (Labor) – 5 percent

Undecided – 4 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (12)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 37 percent

Kaitlyn Jones (Conservative) – 21 percent

Patrick Newsom (Civic) – 20 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 18 percent

Sylvenia Denton (Labor) – 2 percent

Undecided – 2 percent


ANALYSIS: This election could prove competitive. It only takes just the right field of candidates being selected by the voters of each party. What we mean by that statement is that if President Peeta Mellark has to face off against Senator Julie Roydon, Senator Patrick Newsom, and Governor Kaitlyn Jones, then there’s a very real chance that he could lose reelection.

That being said, we must look at the probability of that scenario occurring. Despite that being the ideal scenario for any opposition party, polling still shows that while Julie Roydon will be unopposed, Patrick Newsom is still leading by only a small margin that will likely close whenever primary contests grow closer and Kaitlyn Jones is a full nine points behind Conservative frontrunner Robert F. Maxwell. In this polling survey, we conducted twelve different general election scenarios. Out of those, only one is a perfect storm for the opposition, and even in that scenario, Mellark leads by sixteen points over his closest competitor. In the best case scenario for the President, Newsom is nominated by Civic, reducing the allure of Roydon. This increases the gap between him and his opponents to thirty-three points.

However, it should be noted that the Conservatives have a very real option to revive their party. If Kaitlyn Jones is nominated, polling shows that she immediately jumps into the second or third spots in the polls as voters find her to be charismatic, trustworthy, and a true alternative to President Mellark and Senator Roydon. However, voters simply do not trust Maxwell or Pierce, likely due to Maxwell’s scandals and Pierce’s connection to the Canths.

ELECTION RUNDOWN: Maxwell, Pierce, Jones running for president; Stemp, Murray, Wendle, Germaine, Oliver, Sutherland running for VP

In our latest election rundown:

Three new contenders entered the ring for the presidency, all from the Conservative Party.

  • Robert F. Maxwell: Mr. Maxwell, well known for his iconoclastic run last election, has officially entered the race for the Conservative nomination. He is considered the most well-known contender and is the leader of a particularly outspoken wing of the party that may put him in the driver’s seat this time around. However, he will likely face questions and attacks regarding his email scandal as well as his independent run, which was considered by many to be detrimental to then-President Rick Canth’s run for reelection. Maxwell is once again joined by former Intelligence Secretary Lynn Germaine as his running mate.
  • Secretary Kurtis Pierce: Secretary Pierce, a veteran Conservative who has been with the party since its inception, officially announced his run hours after Mr. Maxwell. Pierce served as former President Rick Canth’s running mate eight years ago and then served as Panem’s Secretary of the Treasury. Pierce will easily pick up the Canth wing of the party, but will face attacks and questions about his time in the Cabinet and about his connections to the former President. Pierce will be running with Jack Oliver, the former Secretary of Global Development, as his pick for VP.
  • Governor Kaitlyn Jones: The last remaining Conservative governor before her defeat four years ago, Jones threw her hat into the ring unexpectedly. While she had made some musings and gotten some attention previously, her political silence following her defeat had been viewed as a permanent retirement. Instead, she came out with guns ablazing, pledging that the Conservative Party deserved a unified leadership and that she would provide it with herself and her running mate, former Interior Secretary Delia Sutherland. Jones faces an uphill slope due to a lack of name recognition, but likewise, this may provide her with a pass from the previous issues of the Conservative Party and allow for a new start should she be nominated.

Six new candidates for vice president emerged as well. In addition to the three previously mentioned, three Labor candidates announced their runs:

  • Governor Thomas Stemp: A well-known name in Labor circles, Stemp has remained mostly quiet since his runs during the time of Katniss Everdeen. However, Stemp announced his newest run on Friday after much speculation. Stemp previously ran for president once, losing in a brokered convention. He also ran for vice president twice, losing the nomination both times. Most recently, he was the governor of District 1 before he was defeated four years ago by now-Governor Zane Tempore. Stemp’s main issue will be that he represents the past of the Labor Party- as in the “Before Felicia Ren” chapter. That time wasn’t much more productive for Labor, but it’s likely that his argument will be that the party then was hampered by President Everdeen’s popularity. Will he be able to make a case in the light of President Mellark’s popularity?
  • Senator Ophelie Murray: She’s back! The former District 3 senator, who even in the past was considered an enigma due to the state’s lean towards the Civic Party, announced that she will run for vice president. Murray is remembered for her run for president against Thomas Stemp, who she now faces off against for VP. Neither won the nomination that year, with future President Rick Canth winning the nomination in a brokered convention. Murray was considered to be politically dead following her disastrous second run for the presidency. However, she’s popped up for a run for VP, and it’s unknown what her platform or rationale will be.
  • Representative Teraton Wendle: Wendle is the current leader of the Labor representatives, and that’s the extent of his name recognition. He announced his run to little fervor, but it appears that he plans to run on the future, not the past. It’s unknown if he will catch wind enough to fly into the nomination, but it’s possible.