Category Archives: Politics

BREAKING: Pres. Mellark announces troop withdrawal from Greece

BREAKING: President Peeta Mellark is set to make an address to the citizens of Panem today in which he will announce the imminent withdrawal of troops from the region of Greece, according to reports coming out of the White House.

The war in Greece, which has led to dozens of Panem troop casualties, has not been popular with the general populace of Panem and has led to middling approvals for the President and his administration. It is not certain if this withdrawal will be following achievement of the goals set forth by Mellark when he announced the intervention or not.

More to come as we get it…

UPDATE: President Mellark addressed the nation moments ago:

“Citizens of Panem, we have finally reached a point in our intervention into the crisis in Greece that we can withdraw our armed forces from the area. This mission was a success, and we accomplished our goals that we set forth when we set out on this mission. Now we will leave this conflict to be settled between the Grecorussian Empire and the Greek forces.

We decided to end our involvement following the recovery of the nuclear materials that had disappeared in Greece and the capture of the nuclear stockpiles there. After agreement with the Grecorussian government, we have decided to take control of the nuclear stockpile permanently by way of transporting it out of the region, which remains quite volatile. There is no reason that such dangerous materials should remain in proximity to such armed conflict, and nuclear weapons should remain a weapon of last resort, something that we cannot ascertain the Greek forces are able to understand.

This victory came with great loss. We must pay tribute to our fallen soldiers and to those who have risked their lives in order to ensure the safety of not only Panem, but also of the world. To all of you, we thank you for your service.

Our mission, however, is still not complete. While we were able to secure all nuclear materials that were disappeared by the Greek forces, some is still unaccounted for. We are not sure who has control of this material, but rest assured that Panem along with her allies will find this material and apprehend those who intend to use it.

Thank you, and God bless the Republic of Panem.”

 

PFP POLL: Mellark/Tarson with healthy lead, Jones and Newsom excel in their primaries

Recent polling conducted by The Panem Free Press shows the Mellark/Tarson ticket to still have a healthy lead as expected even as the President’s approval rating has taken a hit due to the Greek crisis. Meanwhile, Civic candidate Patrick Newsom and Conservative candidate Kaitlyn Jones have rapidly risen to the top of their respective primary fields.

The questions asked were as follows:

  • Which political party do you affiliate with: Liberty, Labor, Centre, Civic, Conservative, Independent, or Undecided?
  • If you belong to the Labor Party, which candidate would you vote for in the:
    • Presidential primary: Iris Canstrom, Sylvenia Denton, Walter Delta, Joan Kindred, or undecided?
    • VP primary: Ophelie Murray, Thomas Stemp, Teraton Wendle, or undecided?
  • If you belong to the Civic Party, which candidate would you vote for in the primary: Patrick Newsom, Samuel Trenton, or undecided?
  • If you belong to the Conservative Party, which candidate would you vote for in the
    • Presidential primary: Robert F. Maxwell, Kaitlyn Jones, Kurtis Pierce, or undecided?
    • VP primary: Lynn Germaine, Jack Oliver, Delia Sutherland, or undecided?
  • What is your opinion of the Mellark administration: positive, neutral, negative, or undecided?
  • Do you approve or disapprove of President Mellark’s performance as president: approve, neutral, disapprove, or undecided?
  • Do you approve or disapprove of Vice President Tarson’s performance as vice president: approve, neutral, disapprove, or undecided?
  • In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support:
    • Peeta Mellark, Joan Kindred, Samuel Trenton, Robert F. Maxwell, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Sylvenia Denton, Samuel Trenton, Robert F. Maxwell, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Joan Kindred, Patrick Newsom, Robert F. Maxwell, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Sylvenia Denton, Patrick Newsom, Robert F. Maxwell, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Joan Kindred, Samuel Trenton, Kurtis Pierce, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Sylvenia Denton, Samuel Trenton, Kurtis Pierce, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Joan Kindred, Patrick Newsom, Kurtis Pierce, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Sylvenia Denton, Patrick Newsom, Kurtis Pierce, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Joan Kindred, Samuel Trenton, Kaitlyn Jones, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Sylvenia Denton, Samuel Trenton, Kaitlyn Jones, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Joan Kindred, Patrick Newsom, Kaitlyn Jones, Julie Roydon, or undecided?
    • Peeta Mellark, Sylvenia Denton, Patrick Newsom, Kaitlyn Jones, Julie Roydon, or undecided?

The results are as follows:

Which political party do you affiliate with?

Liberty – 32 percent

Centre – 27 percent

Labor – 15 percent

Civic – 12 percent

Independent – 5 percent

Conservative – 2 percent

Undecided – 7 percent

If you belong to the Labor Party, which candidate would you vote for in the presidential primary?

Sylvenia Denton – 26 percent

Joan Kindred – 24 percent

Walter Delta – 20 percent

Iris Canstrom – 16 percent

Undecided – 14 percent

If you belong to the Labor Party, which candidate would you vote for in the VP primary?

Thomas Stemp – 37 percent

Ophelie Murray – 36 percent

Teraton Wendle – 18 percent

Undecided – 9 percent

If you belong to the Civic Party, which candidate would you vote for in the primary?

Patrick Newsom – 51 percent

Samuel Trenton – 31 percent

Undecided – 18 percent

If you belong to the Conservative Party, which candidate would you vote for in the presidential primary? 

Kaitlyn Jones – 46 percent

Robert F. Maxwell – 24 percent

Kurtis Pierce – 20 percent

Undecided – 10 percent

If you belong to the Conservative Party, which candidate would you vote for in the VP primary? 

Delia Sutherland – 42 percent

Lynn Germaine – 25 percent

Jack Oliver – 24 percent

Undecided – 9 percent

What is your opinion of the Mellark administration?

Positive – 54 percent

Neutral – 10 percent

Negative – 31 percent

Undecided – 5 percent

Do you approve or disapprove of President Mellark’s performance as president?

Approve – 55 percent

Neutral – 5 percent

Disapprove – 34 percent

Undecided – 6 percent

Do you approve or disapprove of Vice President Tarson’s performance as vice president?

Approve – 62 percent

Neutral – 3 percent

Disapprove – 30 percent

Undecided – 5 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (1)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 55 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 27 percent

Joan Kindred (Labor) – 5 percent

Samuel Trenton (Civic) – 4 percent

Robert F. Maxwell (Conservative) – 4 percent

Undecided – 5 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (2)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 56 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 25 percent

Samuel Trenton (Civic) – 7 percent

Robert F. Maxwell (Conservative) – 4 percent

Sylvenia Denton (Labor) – 2 percent

Undecided – 5 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (3)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 49 percent

Patrick Newsom (Civic) – 22 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 18 percent

Robert F. Maxwell (Conservative) – 4 percent

Joan Kindred (Labor) – 3 percent

Undecided – 4 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (4)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 48 percent

Patrick Newsom (Civic) – 29 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 16 percent

Robert F. Maxwell (Conservative) – 3 percent

Sylvenia Denton (Labor) – 2 percent

Undecided – 2 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (5)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 54 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 26 percent

Joan Kindred (Labor) – 6 percent

Kurtis Pierce (Conservative) – 5 percent

Samuel Trenton (Civic) – 4 percent

Undecided – 5 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (6)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 56 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 26 percent

Samuel Trenton (Civic) – 6 percent

Kurtis Pierce (Conservative) – 3 percent

Sylvenia Denton (Labor) – 2 percent

Undecided – 6 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (7)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 49 percent

Patrick Newsom (Civic) – 25 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 16 percent

Kurtis Pierce (Conservative) – 3 percent

Joan Kindred (Labor) – 2 percent

Undecided – 4 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (8)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 50 percent

Patrick Newsom (Civic) – 26 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 16 percent

Kurtis Pierce (Conservative) – 5 percent

Sylvenia Denton (Labor) – 1 percent

Undecided – 2 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (9)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 45 percent

Kaitlyn Jones (Conservative) – 27 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 14 percent

Joan Kindred (Labor) – 7 percent

Samuel Trenton (Civic) – 4 percent

Undecided – 3 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (10)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 49 percent

Kaitlyn Jones (Conservative) – 23 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 16 percent

Samuel Trenton (Civic) – 4 percent

Sylvenia Denton (Labor) – 2 percent

Undecided – 6 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (11)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 34 percent

Kaitlyn Jones (Conservative) – 21 percent

Patrick Newsom (Civic) – 20 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 18 percent

Joan Kindred (Labor) – 3 percent

Undecided – 4 percent

In a hypothetical election, which of these candidates would you support: (12)

Peeta Mellark (Liberty) – 30 percent

Kaitlyn Jones (Conservative) – 27 percent

Patrick Newsom (Civic) – 22 percent

Julie Roydon (Centre) – 17 percent

Sylvenia Denton (Labor) – 2 percent

Undecided – 2 percent


ANALYSIS: This set of polls should be deeply satisfying for the Jones and Newsom campaigns as they see their leads solidify in the face of the oncoming primaries next week. Likewise, these results should obviously terrify the Trenton, Pierce, and Maxwell campaigns as they now face an imminent threat of defeat. In addition, the Mellark/Tarson campaign should beware: their worst-case scenario isn’t too far off. With Newsom, Jones, and Denton leading their respective primaries, there’s a very real chance that scenario number 12 from above could come true. In that case, the election is within the margin of error with Kaitlyn Jones potentially upending the President in the popular vote.

UK ELECTION: Tories win decreased majority, cement Felton’s leadership

The next general election in the United Kingdom is set to be primarily fought over the Felton government’s ties to the Republic of Panem as the Labour opposition leader Ulysses West has staked his campaign on the coalition agreement involving Panem and the UK in the Greek conflict.

Prime Minister Edith Felton’s Conservative Party will face off against Ulysses West’s Labour Party at the polls two weeks from today after a heated election campaign in which Felton has accused the Labour Party of participating in “the typical IANO fascism.” West has repeatedly invoked the United Kingdom’s coalition policy with the Panem government as a “terrible decision that has led to unprecedented chaos.”

In the face of this brutal campaign, the Tories have seen their support begin to lower in their final days. Eager to prevent what occurred in the past with the 2017 election campaign, Felton has avoided taking center-stage throughout the campaign, relying heavily on her cabinet. Nonetheless, the popularity of Felton and the record 489 seats out of 650 total seats that the party currently holds aren’t considered to be enough on their own, leading some to wonder if Felton may be on the verge of losing her majority. In that case, it’s likely that the Labour Party would be experiencing record support in the modern era and that other parties would likely either dip to record lows or detract from the Conservatives.

The results from the last election were as follows:

Conservatives: 489 seats

Labour: 114 seats

Liberal Democrats: 20 seats

DUP: 9 seats

Sinn Féin: 8 seats

Plaid Cymru: 3 seats

Greens: 1 seat

Other: 6 seats

UPDATE: We have officially received from the BBC their exit poll for the UK general election. The projection from the exit poll is as follows:

Conservatives: 347 seats (-142)

Labour: 148 seats (+34)

Liberal Democrats: 131 seats (+111)

DUP: 12 seats (+3)

Sinn Féin: 7 seats (-1)

Plaid Cymru: 3 seats (-)

Greens: 1 seat (-)

Other: 1 seat (-5)

Bad news for Edith Felton and the Conservatives today as the Prime Minister’s record-breaking majority will be majorly slimmed. Only time will tell if these results are accurate, but previous exit polls have shown to be mostly correct. However, this is still a working majority as 326 seats are needed to govern.

UPDATE 2: We can now confirm that Edith Felton, who is currently already the longest serving female prime minister in addition to being the longest serving Conservative prime minister, will go on to serve a fourth term as prime minister following the results of this election. If the Prime Minister completes this next five year term without facing a leadership spill, vote of no confidence, early election, or early resignation, she will become the second longest-serving prime minister in the United Kingdom’s history.

UPDATE 3: We can now deliver the final seat results for the election.

Conservatives: 355 seats (-134)

Liberal Democrats: 141 seats (+121)

Labour: 130 seats (+16)

DUP: 15 seats (+6)

Sinn Féin: 4 seats (-3)

Plaid Cymru: 3 seats (-)

Greens: 1 seat (-)

Other: 1 seat (-5)

To much surprise, the exit poll results were much farther off than expected. Rather than Ulysses West’s Labour Party becoming the main opposition to Prime Minister Felton’s government, the Liberal Democrats, led by leader Russell Chambers, will now serve as the formal opposition to the Conservative government. Furthermore, the Conservative tally was off by eight seats, as was the DUP total by four seats that were predicted to go to Sinn Féin.

These results, while a bit demoralizing for the Conservatives, were partially expected. It was considered unlikely that the Conservatives would keep such a large majority, but it wasn’t foreseen that the Tories would lose 134 seats. However, Edith Felton maintains her majority, ensuring what should be another five years of Conservative rule. However, the big winners of today are Labour and the LibDems. While many would argue that the two essentially prevented the other from winning, both put a major dent in the Tory majority. This is also the first time that the LibDems will serve as the official opposition, having the ability to form a shadow government as they see fit. This likely will not look well upon Ulysses West, who was seen as Labour’s shining star in an era in which Labour cannot seem to get a grip. However, West’s leadership might be saved due to the gains made this election.

EXCLUSIVE: Presidential hopeful Kaitlyn Jones sits down for interview with Polaris Septrix

Following a major dispute featuring two of the Conservative Party’s most prominent leaders, the debate for the Conservative Party’s presidential candidates was cancelled on Saturday. Today Polaris Septrix sits down with former governor and Conservative presidential hopeful Kaitlyn Jones in an exclusive one-on-one interview with The Panem Free Press.

PS: Let’s get started, shall we? Governor, you were the last remaining Conservative governor in the nation following Governor Xavier Hansen’s abandonment of the Conservative label. How does your time as governor contribute to your ability to potentially serve as Panem’s next president?

KJ: Thank you for having me today. My time as governor was no walk in the park, as many will easily tell you. However, what my critics won’t tell you is that we got a lot done in District 11 under my tenure. Our legislature was a Conservative majority, but we regularly worked with Liberty and Civic members in order to get what our citizens wanted passed and on my desk. We passed tax reform, welfare reform, environmental reform, you name it. In four years, we passed some of the most meaningful legislation in the District’s history. It goes to show that I have ability to govern and to work with people to get to the goal of a better nation.

PS: However, you only got a single term.

KJ: That’s true, unfortunately. The recession hit during my tenure. While we worked as best we could under that pressure, there’s only so much a district government can do to alleviate the issues that come from the Capitol.

PS: So you are blaming your loss on the recession and on President Canth?

KJ: I do think that the recession was a key factor, since many families were hurting and many remembered that the economy wasn’t bad under Liberty Party rule. I think it’s a big factor as to why we have President Mellark right now instead of President Canth. And look, Rick is a nice guy, but I don’t agree with him on many things. I think he lost sight of his values when he got into the White House. You started to see things like higher taxes and poorer decisions, which put us in a bit of a bind. It definitely didn’t make my life any easier.

PS: Well, he’s certainly not far from many people’s minds when they think of the Conservative Party. How do you plan to revitalize the party and its image following Rick Canth’s impeachment?

KJ: I think that Panem currently associates the Conservatives with corruption and with flip flopping. I mentioned previously about President Canth heading the opposite direction with taxation, and people see that and say, “How is this any different than Liberty politicians, or Labor politicians, or Civic politicians, or Centre politicians?” It looks terrible on us when we campaign on a promise and deliver another party’s platform plank. It certainly hurts us deeply as a party when our leaders engage in corruption as well. President Canth isn’t the only one either, it’s Robert F. Maxwell as well. Voters remember his email scandals, and that’s what they remember about Conservatives. They associate our party with everything that our previous leaders have done wrong. That’s why I am running. We need a fresh start, and we can’t have someone who is the image of corruption or even remotely associated with corruption in the case of Secretary Pierce in charge.

PS: Which brings me to my next question: What is your opinion of what happened on Saturday?

KJ: To put it bluntly, I think that Secretary Pierce is right in one way: Mr. Maxwell is simply trying to remain in the lead like the rest of us, and he knows that he can’t be in the lead if the Conservative voters see who he really is. He can’t answer the tough questions and so he sticks to his campaign rallies where he gets to mandate what is discussed. However, the same can be said about Secretary Pierce. I was fully ready to take on Secretary Pierce with Mr. Maxwell in attendance, with an empty podium in place of Mr. Maxwell, or even in just a one-on-one debate. However, Secretary Pierce avoided the fight, just like Mr. Maxwell. It goes to show that there is a real choice in our primary this election season. You can choose Secretary Pierce, who is effectively who President Canth would have wanted to win. You can choose Mr. Maxwell, who is just as corrupt as President Canth was, despite the fact that he says that he wants to change the face of the party. And last and I hope not least, you can choose Governor Kaitlyn Jones, who is none of the above. If you want a real revamp of our party, you can join me and my campaign in fighting for the true Conservative platform, in fighting against corruption regardless if it’s from a Liberty, Labor, Civic, Centre, or Conservative politician, and in fighting for a greater freedom for Panem.

PS: Well, there you have it. Rising star Kaitlyn Jones, former governor of District 11 and potential Conservative nominee for President of the Republic of Panem. Thank you for joining us tonight.

BREAKING: Spat between Maxwell and Pierce forces Conservative debate cancellation

BREAKING: The Conservative Party presidential debate, which was planned to air this Thursday and to be hosted by The Panem Free Press, has been called off with no intent of rescheduling according to sources within the Conservative Party and within the campaigns of the three main candidates.

The debate, which would have featured businessman Robert F. Maxwell, former Secretary Kurtis Pierce, and former Governor Kaitlyn Jones, was cancelled following a row between Maxwell and Pierce. Maxwell alleged that he was being treated unfairly by the debate staff and by the Pierce campaign and declared that he would have no part in a Conservative debate under the conditions that were set forth. When debate staff refused to leave an empty podium in place of Maxwell’s position onstage, Pierce also declined to participate.

The Maxwell campaign only had this to say about the spat:

“Mr. Maxwell will not participate in any debate that does not give him a fair shot of delivering his message to the voters. Instead, Mr. Maxwell will be rallying in District 2 with his supporters and raising money that will be donated to charities that donate to causes that help our nation’s veterans.”

Conversely, the Pierce campaign responded to the story as well, taking a different approach:

“Robert F. Maxwell showed his true colors today, running away from a fight he was destined to lose. However, as long as The Panem Free Press avoids allowing voters to see that Mr. Maxwell isn’t prepared to show up for the job that he is running for, Secretary Pierce will not participate in what Mr. Maxwell describes as an ‘unfair’ debate.”

While the Jones campaign declined to comment when contacted, Governor Jones will participate in a one-on-one interview with former Press Secretary Polaris Septrix here on The Panem Free Press in the place of the Conservative debate.

Real competition? Mellark faces potentially potent candidates in race for reelection

President Peeta Mellark (Liberty-D12) may have began his reelection campaign at the tip-top of the polls, looking like he might coast to reelection in the same way as his first run, but now the President faces a potentially different scenario.

President Mellark, while still remaining popular, is now officially facing a distinct possibility that three popular major candidates will rise from the primary battles waged in Panem’s opposition parties.

Currently the Centre nomination is set to go to Senator Julie Roydon, who has made a name for herself since her election in the previous midterms and proving that she is no political lightweight. Her crowds are regularly that of around 6,000 people at least, showing large support. Roydon consistently has polled highly in presidential polling, typically ranking second to the President.

In the Civic primary, Senator Patrick Newsom has risen to the top of the polls lately after his landmark debate performance against opponent Samuel Trenton. Newsom, to many Civic voters, represents a more activist wing of the party that has typically been pushed aside in favor of the more centrist establishment. Newsom has also been noted for his grassroots support. At this early point, it’s hard to tell if Newsom will be the nominee, but if the campaign continues like it has, it’s likely that Newsom will be able to pose a real threat to the President in a general election.

Last, but certainly not least, is former Governor Kaitlyn Jones. Known for her tenure as the last remaining Conservative governor in Panem, Jones was swept out on an anti-Conservative wave that even her popularity in her district could not save her from. However, Jones unexpectedly declared a run for president this year, despite most analysts predicting that at most she would run for vice president. More unexpected is the amount of support that Jones would garner in a general election. While she currently is third in Conservative primary polling, Jones polls higher in general election polling than her two rivals, typically even edging out Newsom and Roydon when included. This is likely due to her anonymity and due to her campaign to rebrand the party. Voters tend to associate the party with her rivals (Robert F. Maxwell and Kurtis Pierce) and both do not poll well due to their own scandals and relationship to disgraced former President Rick Canth.

However, a true nightmare scenario for President Mellark is if all three of these candidates managed to make it to a general election. True, the president is popular. However, the military intervention in Greece is causing a major dip in his approval numbers, decreasing them by the day. Panem voters when polled have indicated less and less support for the intervention as time has continued, and it’s highly unlikely that Mellark will be able to sustain a massive level of popularity for much longer, especially if the intervention lasts until election day. This is why this scenario is considered dangerous for the President: falling approval ratings along with the three strongest possible candidates could result in a nearly tied election as four candidates take around 20-25% of the vote each, along with potential for spoiler candidates from the Labor Party and independent candidates. In that case, it’s anyone’s guess who the president of Panem will be at the end of the day- and if the current President survives reelection.

However, the likelihood of such a nightmare scenario would be pretty low as of today. Just one part of the conditions that would cause it not occurring (say, Mellark pulls the troops out of Greece sooner rather than later) would likely result in a greater chance of a Mellark reelection, particularly if Jones or Newsom (or both!) lose their nomination fights.

Civic debate sets record for primary debate viewership

Sen. Patrick Newsom (left) and former Sec. Samuel Trenton enter the stage for the first Civic presidential debate.

The Civic Party held their first presidential debate, and it broke barriers in the political world.

The Civic Party, for one, has never held a debate before nor has it had a contested primary up to this point. The previous nominee each election was former President Cecelia Paylor, who founded the party. She stepped aside this year after multiple failed attempts to regain the office she once held. This year, her VP nominee, Samuel Trenton, faces off against firebrand Sen. Patrick Newsom for the nomination. Trenton brings experience to the table, while Newsom has gained a cult following with the base of the party.

The party’s debate last night set a record for viewership, reaching over thirty million viewers across Panem’s media. This is the highest viewership for a primary debate of any party in Panem’s electoral history, with the previous record holder being the first Liberty presidential debate during the last cycle. This record shows an unprecedented amount of enthusiasm for the Civic primary, despite historically abysmal polling.

Candidates were allowed two minutes per response plus an additional minute of rebuttal time under the condition that their name was mentioned by another candidate. Below are highlights of the debate:


ON THE ECONOMY:

Question: While the economy has improved since the beginning of the Mellark administration, both of you have criticized the economic policies used to encourage financial growth. Explain why, and explain what changes your potential administration would implement.

Trenton: “It’s simple: President Mellark has left behind any normal citizen of Panem. Sure, the economy is better for our big corporations, but go ask any Panem citizen if their wallet feels any bigger. My plan would ensure that corporations are held accountable for the monstrosity of a recession that occurred and further propel growth for our middle and lower class citizens. Everyone needs a break.”

Newsom: “As was previously said, we’ve left our citizens behind. The President campaigned in the last election on dropping the corporate tax rate. Why? Because ninety percent of his campaign donations come from big business, who would benefit from such a decrease. He did cut taxes, but the effects of those cuts have been minimal for any citizen who doesn’t make millions of dollars. We need to raise our corporate tax once again, ensure through extensive regulation that Panem corporations cannot allow for such a disaster such as this past recession to occur, and we need to implement a tax system that actually makes sure our richer citizens pay their fair share.”


ON FOREIGN POLICY:

Question: President Mellark has faced increasing controversy over his decision to seek boots on the ground in the region of Greece following threats of nuclear proliferation. What would you do as president to counter the new nuclear threat and to deal with the Greek conflict?

Newsom: “I’ll answer this very quickly. Number one: to counter the nuclear threat, I think that we should counter it with a broad coalition of nations and with the goal of completely denuclearizing this planet. That means every nation with weapons, including us, should rid themselves of nuclear weapons. Number two, the Greek conflict is not ours to fight. We should not intervene in a foreign nation’s affairs.”

Trenton: “This is where I disagree with my opponent. We should not dismantle our nuclear stockpile. There’s no incentive to do so. In fact, we fought a war against a group of nations that sought to do that for us, so let’s not become the IANO and try to denuclearize the world against the world’s wishes. We need to focus on finding the nukes- with a coalition- and getting them back into stable hands. As for the second point, we have no reason to be in Greece beyond the weapons. We should withdraw at that point.”


ON THE CANDIDATES’ RECORDS:

In this section, candidates were asked individualized questions and allowed three minutes for response. If a candidate’s name is mentioned in a response, they are not allowed to respond as with the rules for standard debate.

Question for Sec. Trenton: Secretary Trenton, your opponents and critics have labeled you as a stand-in candidate for Cecelia Paylor, claiming you are no different and that you are destined to lose in the same way as her. What is your response to these attacks?

Trenton: “My name is not Cecelia Paylor. While she’s a dear friend, she’s got very different views from me, starting with foreign policy for one. As for this election, every candidate is different. Everyone campaigns in their own way. I’m not running for vice president, I’m running for president.”

Question for Sen. Newsom: Senator Newsom, your opponents have attacked you for being inexperienced and radical. What is your response to this?

Newsom: “My opponents pick on my experience because they have nothing else to run on. That’s right: I haven’t been a standard-bearer for this party for twenty years. That’s why I’m here. That’s the point. This party literally has been represented by the same wing that Samuel Trenton represents today for four elections. We have lost four elections with this wing of the party, and we desperately need a new face. So, sure, come after me about my inexperience. I’d say that not being known in this case would be a plus. As for ‘radicalism’, that’s just another way of the establishment attempting to discredit true reform of the Civic Party. It has always appeared that the leadership of this party is intent on talking a big talk, only to take the easy way out. It was only after my insistence with my former colleague, Sadie Myers, that we create a true force of opposition in the Senate and House by banding together with the Labor Party. Instead of opposing conservative policies, Secretary Trenton was content to push conservative policies with the Everdeen and Canth administrations. So let me be clear: there’s one choice here that actually represents change, and that would be me. If you want to keep on this disastrous path for our party, Secretary Trenton would be more than happy to guide you down that path to get his lofty appointment in the next Mellark administration.”


We took a flash poll following the debate regarding who won this debate and who lost it.

Questions: 

  • Going into this debate, who were you planning to vote for in your respective district primary?
  • Who do you think was the overall winner of this debate?
  • Who do you think was the overall loser of this debate?
  • Following this debate, who are you planning to vote for in your respective district primary?

The results are below.


Going into this debate, who were you planning to vote for in your respective district primary?

Sec. Trenton – 54 percent

Sen. Newsom – 40 percent

Undecided – 6 percent

Who do you think was the overall winner of this debate?

Sen. Newsom – 78 percent

Sec. Trenton – 16 percent

Undecided – 6 percent

Who do you think was the overall loser of this debate?

Sec. Trenton – 83 percent

Sen. Newsom – 14 percent

 

Undecided – 3 percent

Following this debate, who are you planning to vote for in your respective district primary?

Sen. Newsom – 48 percent

Sec. Trenton – 39 percent

 

Undecided – 13 percent


ANALYSIS: This debate definitely provided a major setback to Secretary Trenton’s campaign. While he had been riding high prior to this debate with a lead in the most recent poll of fourteen points over Senator Newsom, Trenton crashed and burned in this debate, providing Civic voters with a preview of what could come in a future presidential debate. Particularly bad was his handling of his answer on his connection to former President Paylor, which only muddled the issue and showed complete ineptitude according to our focus group, who described the moment as “completely unpresidential.”

Meanwhile, Newsom shined, particularly with his answer on what his critics say about him. This debate rejuvenated the senator’s campaign, bumping him to a nine point lead over Trenton (which amounts to a twenty-three point bump in the polls overall). Our focus group particularly appreciated the fresh ideas and how he was intent on going a step further than what the Civic platform historically has said.

Make no mistake, a major shift happened here today. Newsom proved that his rallies aren’t just show business. Trenton, however, should be very worried right about now.