CONVENTION RUNDOWN: LNC releases speaker list

It’s a time-honored tradition: every four years, the major parties across Panem’s vast political spectrum meet in a grandiose display of their party, complete with speeches by their well-known officeholders, music and entertainment, and of course the official nominations of their candidates for president and vice president.

That’s right, ladies and gentlemen. It’s convention season once again. And for the first time in our history, we’re going to do a convention rundown so you can be sure to know what you need to know before you watch or attend the party convention of your choice.

Let’s start with a brief description of how conventions came to be in Panem politics.


Before the Dark Days, the United States of America dominated the world stage, and it was no shock to anyone that the world watched their political conventions. Like the conventions that take place in Panem now, the US’s conventions were grand celebrations of the party and its candidates, but unlike ours, these conventions largely only handled platform and rules business. These were the conventions that inspired the conventions of today.

However, conventions haven’t always been a staple of presidential and vice presidential contests. During the first presidential election, which elected Katniss Everdeen, no conventions were held due to the lack of political parties. However, by the second election, conventions had begun to take shape. That election featured four parties with four separate conventions. The second election was also the election to set the tradition that the reigning party’s convention be held first with their opponents to follow. With the third election, the amount of conventions grew to five, with one belonging to independent candidate Elizabeth Steinbeck. Finally, we reach the fourth election, which had four conventions across six tickets; this was due to the Steinbeck ticket declining a convention that cycle and the Maxwell ticket declaring after the Conservative convention where he and his running mate, Lynn Germaine, did not win the nomination.


This year, however, we will see an increase in the amount of conventions to a total of five. We will begin our guide to our conventions with the Liberty Party, who will hold their convention first.


Liberty National Convention: June 15th through 19th
Location: District 14

For the first time in Panem’s political history, the convention of a major political party will be held outside of the contiguous districts of Panem. Bids for the Liberty National Convention included Districts 2, 7, 9, and 14. After being runner-up for the second LNC, District 14 declined to bid for the third LNC in hopes of preparing an outstanding bid for the fourth LNC. That, as you can tell, propelled them into becoming the host district for this year’s Liberty National Convention. The message that is sent by the selection of District 14 as the host district is clear: Liberty policy works, and District 14 is a solid example of that.

The LNC is always noted for their large speaker list, as the Liberty Party has been so dominant in Panem politics with the result of never having to worry about a shortage of officeholders. As such, we can display to you the speakers for all four days below. Headliners are placed in italics.

DAY ONE (Rising for a Greater World):

  • Reyna Fults, lieutenant governor (D6)
  • Isabel Holland, former governor (D8)
  • Allan Perry, governor (D13)
  • Edith Delsont, senator (D11)
  • Kendal Folsom, senator (D8)
  • Layla Folsom, governor and former senator (D8)
  • Ronald Brown, Director of the Office of Management and Budget (D13)
  • Cason Hampton, senator (D2)
  • Festus Ashland, governor (D6)
  • Douglas Boyd, former governor (D5)
  • Plutarch Heavensbee, former Vice President (Capitol)
  • Constantin Richelieu, Speaker of the House (D14)
  • Elizabeth Steinbeck, Ambassador to the CN (D8)
  • Rosalie Descoteaux, Secretary of the Treasury (D14)
  • Celine Oswald, Secretary of State, former VP, and former presidential nominee (D13)
  • Trevor Patton, Secretary-General of the CN (D2)
  • Katniss Everdeen, First Lady of Panem, former President of Panem, and former Secretary-General of the CN (D12)

DAY TWO (Rising for a Greater Future): 

  • Bella Taylor, Secretary of Health and Human Services (D2)
  • Wendy Oppenheim, senator (D13)
  • Felicity Bass, senator (D1)
  • Effie Trinket, Secretary of Global Development (Capitol)
  • Haymitch Abernathy, Secretary of Homeland Security (D12)
  • Celeste Armstrong, chief executive (Capitol)
  • Zane Tempore, governor (D1)
  • Felix Warren, governor (D2)
  • Serena Ross, governor (D5)
  • Mason Wallace, governor (D7)
  • Lynnette Cortez, governor (D12)
  • Raphaël Maçon, Secretary of Labor (D14)
  • Gertrude Hampton, former governor (D12)
  • Robert Kelso, Secretary of Education (D12)
  • Hanley Trent, senator (D12)
  • Jacqueline Warner, senator and former Solicitor General (D7)
  • Valère Descoteaux, senator (D14)
  • Jonathan Madison, Secretary of Defense and former acting president (D4)
  • Dale Wilson, Secretary of Intelligence and former President of the Republic of Panem (D4)

DAY THREE (Rising for a Greater Government):

  • Rosalie Underwood, Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (D4)
  • Tyler Thompson, Secretary of Commerce and former VP (D5)
  • Manfred Weston, senator (D1)
  • Darien Sanford, senator (D15)
  • Wesley Benson, senator (Capitol)
  • Amanda Qurius, senator (D5)
  • Vance James, senator (D2)
  • Beetee Latier, Secretary of Communications (D15/Capitol)
  • James Peliot, Secretary of Transportation (D5)
  • Cynthia Garth, Secretary of International Trade (D5)
  • Miranda O’Neal, House Majority Leader (D13)
  • Karina Erickson, Solicitor General and former Attorney General (D13)
  • Owen Talton, senator and former governor (D13)
  • Amy Oaksmith, Secretary of the Interior (D7)
  • Royce Melbourne, governor (D14)
  • Gale Hawthorne, governor and former Secretary of Defense (D15/D2)
  • Harold Cersisa, governor, former VP, former Chief of Staff to the President, and former Secretary of the Treasury (D4)
  • Rebecca Tarson, Vice President of the Republic of Panem and presumptive VP nominee (D12)

DAY FOUR (Rising for a Greater Panem):

  • Sophia Delacruz, Senate president pro tempore (D5)
  • Xavier Hansen, governor (D10)
  • Viona Rodgers, businesswoman and congressional candidate (D8)
  • Quake Jones, Secretary of Agriculture (D11)
  • Woodrow Thorpe, former senator (D13)
  • Ginger Freedman, former senator (D10)
  • Walter Singleton, Secretary of Energy (D12)
  • Polly Hector, former Secretary of Agriculture (D11)
  • Melody Clements, representative (D2)
  • Ricky Sawyer, congressional candidate (D4)
  • Colleen Stringer, district senator and congressional candidate (D3)
  • Antonio Wallace, senator (D4)
  • Charlton Harrison, senator (D4)
  • Walter Briscoe, senator (D7)
  • Antonin Thibault, senator (D14)
  • Jacob Ellsworth, senator (D3)
  • Trenton Escavel, governor (D9)
  • Wesley Benson, senator and former Chief Executive (Capitol)
  • Michael Debroff, Senate Majority Leader (D11)
  • Peeta Mellark, President of the Republic of Panem and presumptive presidential nominee (D12)

The Liberty National Convention is stacked with prominent speakers from across the nation. Most notable is how instead of naming one speaker as the keynote speaker of the convention, the Liberty National Committee has determined to fill up to five spots a night as “headliner” spots that will be broadcasted in primetime. These spots particularly show the theme of the nights in question. In the case of night one, headliners include Secretary-General Trevor Patton, Secretary of State Celine Oswald, Ambassador Elizabeth Steinbeck, Secretary of the Treasury Rosalie Descoteaux, and First Lady Katniss Everdeen, all of which are strong on the theme of foreign policy. For night two, the LNC has slated Senator Jacqueline Warner, Senator Valère Descoteaux, Secretary of Defense Jonathan Madison, and Secretary of Intelligence Dale Wilson to speak on the innovations that the Mellark administration has undertaken and how Liberty is the party of the future. For night three, headliners include Secretary of the Interior Amy Oaksmith, Governor Royce Melbourne, Governor Gale Hawthorne, Governor Harold Cersisa, and Vice President Rebecca Tarson. All are heavy hitters as governors in the past or present, and all are uniquely positioned to discuss the domestic issues facing Panem. For the final night, Senators Jacob Ellsworth, Wesley Benson, and Michael Debroff will speak along with Governor Trenton Escavel before President Peeta Mellark assumes the stage for his acceptance speech. These speakers were presumably selected due to their home districts; Ellsworth is from District 3 and serves in the Senate with Civic nominee Patrick Newsom; Benson is from the Capitol and serves in the Senate with Centre nominee Julie Roydon; Debroff is from District 11, where Conservative nominee Kaitlyn Jones was previously governor; and Escavel is governor of District 9, where Iris Canstrom, the Labor nominee, is senator.

Every spectator will be watching this convention carefully. Conventions can be a very good indicator of the future of the party’s campaign; Conservatives discovered this in the last election where a chaotic convention led to a miserable defeat on election day. Mellark and Tarson need a spotless convention, one that reaches every ratings milestone and conjures up true enthusiasm for the Liberty ticket.

Conservative nominee Kaitlyn Jones spurns Canth endorsements

It seems that these days no Canth family members are liked. Apparently, that’s the case even within their own party.

Former District 11 governor Kaitlyn Jones, the newly-anointed Conservative nominee for president, and her running mate, former Interior secretary Delia Sutherland, were contacted by former President Rick Canth and Representative Jackson Canth, the previous nominees for the Conservative Party. The letter, sent from the prison that both Canths currently are serving time in, congratulated Jones and Sutherland on their wins in the Conservative Party’s primary process and offered the two brothers’ endorsements.

The answer to the endorsement offer, according to the Jones-Sutherland campaign, is “not no, but hell no.”

In a comment given to The Panem Free Press, the spokesman for the Conservative Party campaign made it quite clear that the Canth endorsements were far from accepted. “President Canth and his brother made a laughing stock of the Conservative Party and nearly destroyed the integrity of the office of the presidency. We suggest that the former President and Mr. Canth refrain from making any further comments regarding the Conservative campaign for president unless they seek to have legal action taken against them,” the spokesman stated.

This break from the Canth era of the Conservative Party is hardly unexpected. Jones cordially rebuked the Canth administration during her one-on-one interview with The Panem Free Press and made it a point to distinguish her brand of Conservative ideology from that of the former President’s. Jones and Sutherland have both been candid about their fierce disagreement with Canth and much of how he approached his presidency- and how that directly impacted their careers.

The Canths, undoubtedly keeping in mind the legal threat from the Jones-Sutherland campaign, declined to comment when contacted for this story.

BREAKING: Julie Roydon announces Matthias Christian as VP running mate

Centre Party nominee Julie Roydon has made her pick for vice president official today in District 10.

Roydon, a senator from the Capitol, has selected Representative Matthias Christian as her vice presidential running mate for the upcoming general election. She made the big announcement in at a campaign rally in District 10, where Christian currently serves in Congress.

“Matthias Christian is a man of integrity and honor. He is a man who truly understands the sacrifice that our armed forces undergo each and every day. He understands the fight that our citizens endure as they watch their infrastructure deteriorate, discover their government has become less transparent, and their fear that their country will become involved in conflict after conflict when we don’t have any reason to be. Matthias Christian is an excellent representative, and he will be an outstanding Vice President of the Republic of Panem.” — Senator Julie Roydon (Centre-Capitol)

Roydon’s pick of Christian as her running mate shows that she is making a definite move for the voters of President Mellark, the Liberty Party’s nominee. Christian was acknowledged to be the more right-wing pick of the three potential VP nominees from the shortlist released by Roydon only two weeks ago.

This decision also may push Senator Patrick Newsom, the Civic nominee, to make a choice that appeals more to the left. Newsom, whose party allows him to select who he will run with, may feel following this announcement that there is a definite left-wing void to be filled in the VP race, leading him to select a more progressive nominee such as Senator Quentin Kennedy or Representative Amelia Vance. Likewise, he may wait to see the results of the Labor National Convention where Labor will nominate their VP candidate after a brutal primary.

The announcement of the Roydon-Christian ticket makes for the third finalized ticket for the general election, along with President Mellark and Vice President Tarson as the Liberty Party nominees and former Governor Kaitlyn Jones and former Secretary Delia Sutherland as the nominees of the Conservative Party.

Civic nominee Patrick Newsom releases VP shortlist

Senator Patrick Newsom, the Civic Party’s nominee for president, released a four-name shortlist for his future nomination for the Civic Party’s vice presidential nomination.

Like the Centre Party, the Civic Party forgoes a primary contest to select their nominee for vice president, rather allowing the presidential nominee to select their own choice for a running mate.

The shortlist is as follows:

  • Samuel Trenton, former Cabinet Secretary and VP nominee (Capitol): Trenton would be a unifying choice for certain; though Newsom swept the contests, many Trenton voters are uncertain of their party’s nominee following a heated primary contest and would likely be pleased if Trenton joined the ticket as the VP nominee. The bad part about the pick is that while Newsom is seen as potentially electable, Trenton has already competed for the vice presidency three times- and he lost all three times. Voters know him, and voters haven’t been keen on voting for him. There’s no indication that this would change, which may end up leading to a split result in the executive branch.
  • Sadie Myers, former senator (D3): Myers served for many years in the Senate and served as the leader of the Civic senators for most of that time. Newsom may be inclined to pick her due to his friendship that he’s developed with Myers after serving with her in the Senate for years and also because she may appeal to Trenton voters who are looking for a less volatile choice for VP. The bad part is that voters rejected her narrowly in District 3, the most Civic district in the nation. An argument could be made, as with Trenton, that Myers is unelectable, which could lead to a push to select someone else.
  • Quentin Kennedy, senator (D6): Civic only has so many officeholders to go around, so the fact that Kennedy is under consideration isn’t a shock. However, it is both a pro and a con that Kennedy is virtually unknown to the general public; though he has a large following in District 6, most of the nation is rather unaware. This also extends to Civic voters, a majority of which confirmed in a recent poll that they had never heard of him. While this does take away the advantage of name recognition, it also may allow for new opinions to be formed and possibly allow Kennedy to serve as a running mate that would unite the party.
  • Amelia Vance, representative (D10): The biggest shock of the shortlist, Amelia Vance, who represents District 10’s second congressional district in Congress, was included. Vance is known for her ardent anti-war stance and for her failed legislation that would reverse the Mellark tax cuts for corporations. Vance would be a definite rebuke to the Trenton wing, pushing away the centrist establishment for a true left-wing ticket that would seek to distinguish themselves from the Labor Party. Vance, however, has a clear lack of experience; Joan Kindred and Jackson Canth were likewise attacked for their lack of governing and foreign policy experience.

Newsom has not set a date as to when he will announce his final choice for vice president, but it is likely that he will announce before the Civic convention in June.

The Election Mellark Never Wanted

The Presidential Nominees, clockwise from top left: President Peeta Mellark (Liberty Party), Senator Julie Roydon (Centre Party), former Governor Kaitlyn Jones (Conservative Party), Senator Iris Canstrom (Labor Party), and Senator Patrick Newsom (Civic Party).

President Peeta Mellark (Liberty-D12) had a particular set of names that he wanted to see emerge victorious in the opposition primaries a week ago. Specifically, those names would be former Secretary Samuel Trenton as the Civic nominee, Representative Sylvenia Denton as the Labor nominee (or at least former Secretary Walter Delta), and businessman Robert F. Maxwell as the Conservative nominee. The more candidates from his list to win, the higher the President’s reelection chances rose.

Not one hand fell in his favor.

Instead, the President now faces what is likely to be the closest election of our lifetime. We now have a five-way race for president: Mellark vs. Canstrom vs. Newsom vs. Jones vs. Roydon. Each candidate is particularly remarkable and exceptionally strong; each party, against the odds, has fielded a candidate that could conceivably win.

In the Civic Party’s first competitive primary, voters have selected Patrick Newsom, the firebrand senior senator from District 3. He stunningly defeated Samuel Trenton, the former VP nominee and establishment candidate in a fashion that could only be described as a wipeout. Telegenic, an excellent debater, and known for never equivocating on his progressive values, Newsom’s future as a candidate now depends on ensuring that Samuel Trenton’s wing of the party, along with former President Cecelia Paylor, decide to vote for him in the general election after a destructive primary that determined the future of the Civic Party. Furthermore, his trailblazing attitude is attractive to some, but not to all. A docile VP pick may set worries to rest for many who dislike him.

The Labor Party surprisingly produced Senator Iris Canstrom as their pick for president. Canstrom, the current Labor leader in the Senate, ran as a reformer for both the Labor Party and for the nation. Since her campaign announcement, Canstrom has been viewed as the underdog, and yet she managed to dispatch longtime Labor heavyweights Joan Kindred and Walter Delta in the primary. Her path to victory lies with convincing centrist and Civic voters to come her way; which group she decides to woo will likely be determined by which VP candidate wins the nomination at the Labor National Convention in June.

From the Conservative Party comes former Governor Kaitlyn Jones of District 11. Jones snatched the reins of the Conservative Party when former Secretary Kurtis Pierce and businessman Robert F. Maxwell were too busy bickering over minor debate details, sweeping the primaries and leaving only 600 delegates between her two competitors. Like Canstrom and Newsom, Jones was viewed as a political novice in national politics as analysts insisted that Pierce or Maxwell was most likely to finally take the nomination that they longed for. Jones is complemented by her running mate, former Secretary Delia Sutherland, who adds foreign policy experience from the time that she served in the Presidential Cabinet as Secretary of Intelligence. The ticket is well balanced in terms of Conservative voters; Maxwell voters like Jones’s style, while Pierce voters appreciate the complementary presence of Sutherland. Jones’s path to the White House lies in convincing Liberty and Centre voters that President Mellark isn’t doing enough to reform the nation and that he has spent too much time at war and not enough time at home.

Finally, there’s the Centre Party’s Julie Roydon. A senator sworn in only two years ago, Roydon is articulate and challenging, stubborn and bold. She’s been at the forefront of the Senate’s most brutal and high profile battles, only second in notoriety to her colleague Senator Clarke Randall. Roydon was unopposed in her run for the Centre nomination and will be able to select her own VP nominee as well. Her path to victory has significantly increased over the past week; with more candidates, there’s more vote splitting. As long as Roydon and her running mate can keep her voters committed and turning out, along with collecting unhappy Liberty, Conservative, Labor, and Civic voters, she may be able to build a ragtag coalition that will manage to put her in the White House.

The biggest obstacle to every candidate, however, is the Electoral College. In recent years, opposition parties have pushed for the abolition of the entity, stating that it is stacked in favor of the Liberty Party, but those cries were largely hushed with the election of President Rick Canth, a Conservative. With five strong candidates of different political stripes, it’s hard to predict (minus a few districts, of course) how the vote will break down in the EC. There’s a real possibility that the Electoral Reform Act may come into play for the first time. For those who don’t recall, the ERA was passed under President Canth following his election as president, where Canth was elected by the House of Representatives following losing the EC vote to Celine Oswald. This act removes the House from the EC equation, stating that in the event no candidate hits the needed number of electors to be elected president, the election will go to a second round with the two candidates that received the most EC votes. Voters will then vote in the runoff election, and whoever receives fifty percent of the electoral votes will, of course, win the election.

In this case, it’s not hard to see how President Mellark could find himself on the losing side. Even if he manages to make it to a second round, he could find that the voters of the other candidates choose to vote for his second round opponent. Likewise, the voters could turn on his opponent in favor of him.

There’s only one way to describe this election now: too close to call.

 

BREAKING: Centre nominee Julie Roydon releases final VP shortlist

BREAKING: Senator Julie Roydon, the Centre Party’s nominee for president of Panem, has released her final shortlist for her vice presidential nominee.

The list is as follows:

  • Joseph Garrett, senator (D15): Garrett brings the most gravitas to the ticket in a party that has very little gravitas to give. However, the selection of Garrett puts his District 15 Senate seat in peril as his replacement would be named by Liberty governor Gale Hawthorne pending a special election. Garrett is as close to a centrist as possible, making him Roydon’s ideal pick.
  • Matthias Christian, representative (D10): Christian, one of the two Christian brothers that currently represent District 10 in Congress, is considered to be a solid pick. Christian is a solid debater, photogenic, and very popular among his constituents. He also serves on the Armed Services Committee in the House as the ranking member from the Centre Party and served a tour in Oceania while in the Panem Army. Christian would be the best pick to appeal to Liberty voters as he tends to lean right.
  • Adrianne Horsfall, representative (D1): Horsfall is a close friend of Roydon’s, hence why she likely made the shortlist. However, Horsfall could be a viable pick due to her tenure as a representative, where she serves on the Judiciary Committee and as ranking member on the Homeland Security Committee. Horsfall tends to be more left-wing than other Centre members, which would appeal more to Civic and Labor members.

The Centre Party, along with the Civic Party, nominate their vice presidential candidates without the use of a primary process, instead determining them by nomination by the presidential candidate.

 

PRIMARIES DAY TWO: Labor and Conservatives face off in final primaries in Capitol, D4, D7, D8, D10, D13, D14, and D15

It’s the second primary day for the voters of Panem, with Labor and the Conservatives holding their primaries today in the final eight of the fifteen districts.

Today, however, we will only see results from two different parties rather than all five parties as President Mellark and Vice President Tarson are unopposed in the Liberty Party’s primary for president and VP, while Senator Julie Roydon is unopposed in the Centre Party’s primary for president. Due to internal party rules, neither the Civic or Centre Party will hold primary elections to select their VP nominee, opting instead to allow their nominee to be selected by the candidate or elected by their party convention delegates. Following the previous round, Civic candidate Samuel Trenton dropped out of the Civic presidential primary, causing Senator Patrick Newsom to become the presumptive nominee. As such, we will carry no coverage of the Civic contests, which are expected to go to Newsom due to Trenton’s withdrawal.

The Panem Free Press will be reporting on presidential results only due to the high amount of information that will be put forth during tonight’s reporting.

Our predictions are as follows:

LABOR (PRESIDENT, THEN VP):

The Capitol (200 delegates): Likely Canstrom, Safe Wendle
D4 (500 delegates): Likely Denton, Tossup
D7 (350 delegates): Lean Kindred, Lean Wendle
D8 (300 delegates): Lean Canstrom, Tossup
D10 (150 delegates): Likely Canstrom, Lean Stemp
D13 (200 delegates): Tossup, Lean Murray
D14 (250 delegates): Lean Canstrom, Lean Stemp
D15 (200 delegates): Likely Canstrom, Likely Wendle

Delegates needed for nomination: 1,925 delegates

Current presidential delegate count: Canstrom 650, Kindred 500, Delta 350, Denton 250

Current VP delegate count: Wendle 800, Stemp 650, Murray 300

2,100 delegates at stake in Labor’s primaries tonight, and as we previously mentioned, Canstrom is favored in more of these. As things stand, Canstrom has 650 delegates, which is 1,276 short of the nomination. However, should Canstrom win the Capitol, D8, D10, D14, and D15, that puts her at 1,750 delegates, only 175 short. With a win in District 13, which we rate as a tossup, Canstrom will clinch the nomination by 25 delegates. The game plan for Denton, Kindred, and Delta is to at least win District 13 and whichever districts they are predicted to win. If they don’t, Canstrom wins. In the VP race, Wendle has a nicer map today. There’s a pretty decent chance, however, that this race turns into a convention fight; unless Wendle wins D4, there’s no viable path for any candidate.

CONSERVATIVE (PRESIDENT, THEN VP):

The Capitol (100 delegates): Likely Pierce, Likely Oliver
D4 (500 delegates): Tossup, Safe Sutherland
D7 (300 delegates): Lean Jones, Lean Sutherland
D8 (200 delegates): Tossup, Tossup
D10 (350 delegates): Likely Jones, Lean Sutherland
D13 (200 delegates): Tossup, Tossup
D14 (300 delegates): Lean Jones, Tossup
D15 (150 delegates): Likely Pierce, Lean Sutherland

Delegates needed for nomination: 1,900 delegates

Current presidential delegate count: Jones 1,350, Pierce 250, Maxwell 100

Current VP delegate count: Sutherland 1,250, Oliver 350, Germaine 100

2,100 delegates up for grabs for Conservatives. With Maxwell out, District 4 becomes a tossup and the ultimate prize of these contests. If Jones stays the course, however, she will easily clinch the nomination even without D4. With her 1,350 delegates from previous contests, Jones is set to be the Conservative nominee should she win D7, D10, and D14 as anticipated. That would put her at 2,300 delegates, which is 400 delegates more than the 50% threshold of 1,900 delegates needed to become the nominee. In the VP race, Sutherland is expected to cruise to the nomination after her wins tonight; she only needs 650 delegates to win the nomination, and she’s predicted to win D4, D7, D10, and D15, which will provide her with 1,300 delegates to bring her to a total of 2,550 delegates. That’s 650 delegates over the threshold.

We’ll be back with results when they come in.

UPDATE: We now have our first results out of the Capitol and District 15.

In the Labor primaries, Senator Iris Canstrom wins both the Capitol and District 15. This brings the Labor delegate count to Canstrom 1,050, Kindred 500, Delta 350, Denton 250.

CANSTROM WINS (Capitol Labor) – 10%

Iris Canstrom – 46 percent

Joan Kindred – 29 percent

Walter Delta – 22 percent

Sylvenia Denton – 3 percent

CANSTROM WINS (D15 Labor) – 14%

Iris Canstrom – 51 percent

Walter Delta –  24 percent

Joan Kindred – 20 percent

Sylvenia Denton – 5 percent

In the Conservative primaries, former Secretary Kurtis Pierce notches two wins in the Capitol and D15. This brings the Conservative delegate count to Jones 1,350, Pierce 500, Maxwell 100.

PIERCE WINS (Capitol Con.) – 13%

Kurtis Pierce – 65 percent

Kaitlyn Jones – 35 percent

PIERCE WINS (D15 Con.) – 14%

Kurtis Pierce – 68 percent

Kaitlyn Jones – 32 percent

With the withdrawal of Samuel Trenton, Senator Patrick Newsom has formally hit the threshold needed for nomination as the presidential nominee of the Civic Party with his win in the Capitol. 

UPDATE 2: We now have results from Districts 7 and 8.

In the Labor primaries, Joan Kindred leads in District 7 and Iris Canstrom leads in District 8. Both contests are currently too early to call.

Lean Kindred (D7 Labor) – 2%

Joan Kindred – 35 percent

Iris Canstrom – 29 percent

Walter Delta – 21 percent

Sylvenia Denton – 15 percent

Lean Canstrom (D8 Labor) – 4%

Iris Canstrom – 36 percent

Walter Delta –  32 percent

Joan Kindred – 23 percent

Sylvenia Denton – 9 percent

In the Conservative primaries, former Governor Kaitlyn Jones surprisingly sweeps the District 7 and 8 primaries despite polling showing closer races in the districts following Maxwell’s exit. This brings the Conservative delegate count to Jones 1,850, Pierce 500, Maxwell 100. 

JONES WINS (D7 Con.) – 16%

Kaitlyn Jones – 58 percent

Kurtis Pierce – 42 percent

JONES WINS (D8 Con.) – 20%

Kaitlyn Jones – 56 percent

Kurtis Pierce – 44 percent

UPDATE 3: We can now declare Joan Kindred the winner in Labor’s D7 primary and Iris Canstrom the winner in Labor’s D8 primary. This brings the Labor delegate count to Canstrom 1,350, Kindred 850, Delta 350, Denton 250.

KINDRED WINS (D7 Labor) – 42%

Joan Kindred – 40 percent

Iris Canstrom – 29 percent

Walter Delta – 21 percent

Sylvenia Denton – 15 percent

CANSTROM WINS (D8 Labor) – 44%

Iris Canstrom – 39 percent

Walter Delta –  28 percent

Joan Kindred – 27 percent

Sylvenia Denton – 9 percent

UPDATE 4: We now have results out of Districts 13 and 14.

In the Labor primaries, Walter Delta barely leads in District 13 and Iris Canstrom wins District 14. This brings the Labor delegate count to Canstrom 1,600, Kindred 850, Delta 350, Denton 250.

Tossup (D13 Labor) – 22%

Walter Delta – 32 percent

Iris Canstrom – 31 percent

Joan Kindred – 25 percent

Sylvenia Denton – 12 percent

CANSTROM WINS (D14 Labor) – 24%

Iris Canstrom – 36 percent

Walter Delta –  25 percent

Joan Kindred – 23 percent

Sylvenia Denton – 16 percent

In the Conservative primaries, District 13 is too close to call. However, former Governor Kaitlyn Jones wins District 14. This brings the Conservative delegate count to Jones 2,150, Pierce 500, Maxwell 100.  

With her win in District 14, we can now announce that former Governor Kaitlyn Jones has hit the threshold needed to become the Conservative Party’s presidential nominee. 

Tossup (D13 Con.) – 16%

Kaitlyn Jones – 52 percent

Kurtis Pierce – 48 percent

JONES WINS (D14 Con.) – 20%

Kaitlyn Jones – 59 percent

Kurtis Pierce – 41 percent

UPDATE 5: We now have final results out of District 13.

In the fiercely contested Labor primary, we can now predict with 99 percent of the vote in that Iris Canstrom will carry the district. This brings the Labor delegate count to Canstrom 1,800, Kindred 850, Delta 350, Denton 250.

CANSTROM WINS (D13 Labor) – 99%

Iris Canstrom – 34 percent

Walter Delta – 30 percent

Joan Kindred – 24 percent

Sylvenia Denton – 12 percent

In the Conservative primary, we can now call District 13 for the new Conservative nominee, Kaitlyn Jones. This brings the Conservative delegate count to Jones 2,350, Pierce 500, Maxwell 100. 

Tossup (D13 Con.) – 96%

Kaitlyn Jones – 53 percent

Kurtis Pierce – 47 percent

UPDATE 6: We now have results out of our final two districts of the night, Districts 4 and 10.

In the Labor primary, we can now call both primaries. In District 4, the winner is Representative Sylvenia Denton by a narrower than expected margin. In District 10, Senator Iris Canstrom seizes the district with a strong win. This brings the Labor delegate count to Canstrom 1,950, Kindred 850, Denton 750, Delta 350.

With her win in District 10, we can announce that Senator Iris Canstrom has secured the needed delegates to become the Labor Party’s presidential nominee.

DENTON WINS (D4 Labor) – 15%

Sylvenia Denton – 45 percent

Iris Canstrom – 36 percent

Joan Kindred – 11 percent

Walter Delta – 8 percent

CANSTROM WINS (D10 Labor) – 17%

Iris Canstrom – 56 percent

Joan Kindred –  19 percent

Walter Delta – 17 percent

Sylvenia Denton – 8 percent

In the Conservative primaries, we can surprisingly call both districts on the table. Both District 4 and District 10 will go easily to Conservative nominee Kaitlyn Jones. This brings the Conservative delegate count to Jones 3,200, Pierce 500, Maxwell 100.

JONES WINS (D4 Con.) – 4%

Kaitlyn Jones – 61 percent

Kurtis Pierce – 39 percent

JONES WINS (D10 Con.) – 5%

Kaitlyn Jones – 65 percent

Kurtis Pierce – 35 percent

UPDATE 7: We can now report the results of the VP primaries of the Labor and Conservative Parties.

LABOR:

The Capitol (200 delegates): Teraton Wendle
D4 (500 delegates): Thomas Stemp
D7 (350 delegates): Teraton Wendle
D8 (300 delegates): Teraton Wendle
D10 (150 delegates): Thomas Stemp
D13 (200 delegates): Ophelie Murray
D14 (250 delegates): Thomas Stemp
D15 (200 delegates): Teraton Wendle

Delegates needed for nomination: 1,925 delegates

Final VP delegate count: Wendle 1,850, Stemp 1,550, Murray 500

Following all contests, no candidate has amassed the needed delegates to become the Labor Party’s VP nominee. As such, the first ballot will be inconclusive, leading to a brokered convention.

CONSERVATIVE:

The Capitol (100 delegates): Jack Oliver
D4 (500 delegates): Delia Sutherland
D7 (300 delegates): Delia Sutherland
D8 (200 delegates): Delia Sutherland
D10 (350 delegates): Delia Sutherland
D13 (200 delegates): Delia Sutherland
D14 (300 delegates): Delia Sutherland
D15 (150 delegates): Delia Sutherland

Delegates needed for nomination: 1,900 delegates

Final VP delegate count: Sutherland 3,250, Oliver 450, Germaine 100

Former Secretary Delia Sutherland following all contests will have the needed delegates to become the Conservative Party’s VP nominee.

UPDATE 8: Reports say that Joan Kindred and Walter Delta have called Iris Canstrom to concede the nomination to her. Likewise, Kurtis Pierce conceded the Conservative nomination to Kaitlyn Jones moments ago.

No word has been given on if Sylvenia Denton will concede the election to Canstrom.

UPDATE 9: We now can confirm that Sylvenia Denton has called to concede the Labor Party’s nomination to Iris Canstrom, but witnesses called the phone call a “very terse conversation” and stated that no endorsement was given, only a concession.

UPDATE 10: Senator Iris Canstrom, the recently-crowned Labor Party nominee for president, appeared onstage at a rally in District 10 to deliver a victory speech:

“Thank you, District 10, and thank you, Panem! Against the odds, we have won the Labor nomination! This is one step towards reform of this party, and it’s one step towards true progressive reform in the White House. Our journey begins tonight, and by November, we will take this movement all the way to the Capitol and unseat President Mellark!”

UPDATE 11: Governor Kaitlyn Jones, the newly-minted Conservative nominee for president, appeared with her vice presidential nominee, Delia Sutherland, at her victory party in District 11:

“A few months ago, hardly anyone had heard of me. I was a former governor- albeit, one with a proven track record of how Conservative policies could work. Over these past few months, I have, along with Delia, found just how many Conservatives there really are. Despite what you hear, despite what the media wants you to believe, there is a silent majority, one that is coming out in full force. I’m here for them, and I’m here for you. Now, we bring this majority to the general election, and to the White House!”

UPDATE 12: Senator Patrick Newsom, Civic nominee for president, appeared in District 3 at his victory rally:

“It’s time for a true leader in the White House, and I’m ready to provide that change. Overwhelmingly, you have all provided me with your trust to go and face off against President Mellark in November. Let me be clear: presidents don’t scare me, and it’s time that we replace this one. It’s time for true left-wing policy and reform. It’s time to hold the rich and the corporations accountable. It’s time to ensure that nuclear weapons aren’t even available to be stolen. It’s time to make sure that Panem is safe, secure, and stable.”